New Small Arms Qualifications

#RoadtoAwesome #KeepPounding #AmericasArmyReserve #USArmyReserve

Change is coming. The U.S. Army Reserve needs to prepare now.

https://www.army.mil/article/218407/new_marksmanship_test_aims_to_create_more_realistic_environment

While it hasn’t received as much attention as the new Army physical fitness evaluation, the 40 targets on the rifle marksmanship range are also about to be engaged in a more combat-focused manner.

The U.S. Army released a set of Training Circulars that redacted the previous doctrine and established a new way to teach small arms skills. That was back in FY2016. If you or other Army personnel are still discussing “four fundamentals”, using silhouette targets for zeroing, and not implementing a Shot Process with a Peer and/or Experienced Coach, you’re three years behind the power curve.

This new doctrine is also redacting old qualifications with a more difficult and realistic course. TC 3-20.40 is pending publication and it revamps all individual weapon qualifications. Another Training Circular soon to follow will do the same with crew-served weapons.

The Army Reserve Marksmanship Program has already created material to help. The Army Reserve Marksman newsletter has article discussing this new doctrine. The World-wide Chief, Army Reserve Postal Matches has courses that can be conducted during routine group/zero and qualification without additional resources, making it an easy, fast, inexpensive, and effective way to practice the new doctrine and prepare for the new qualification.

Download the current Training Circulars and prepare today.

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Army Reserve Shotgun Champ Targets Recruiting

Sgt. 1st Class Brian Stoa doesn’t often shoot issue military weapons on typical military ranges. He is a aerial target shooter and competes in multiple competitive shotgun disciplines, including Trap, Skeet, and Sporting Clays. This year he earned his way on to the Army Skeet Team to compete in the Armed Forces Skeet Championship, winning in two events both with the team and as an individual. Stoa has earned shooting titles in Minnesota, South Dakota, Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, and Alaska.

“I am an Army Reserve Soldier serving on Active Guard Reserve status and shoot on the Army Skeet Team. I took third place at the Utah State Trap Shooting Championship competing against over 300 competitors, some of which are professionals.” say Sgt. 1st Class Stoa. “I enjoy traveling the country to shoot at all the different facilities in competition. You don’t give up your life when you join the Army, you enhance it!”

Sgt. 1st Class Stoa is from southern Minnesota where he was assigned as a Reserve Recruiter and is currently stationed in Alaska where he serves as a Reserve Guidance Counselor and Recruiter (MOS 79R) assigned to United States Army Recruiting Command (USAREC) at the Anchorage Military Entrance Processing Station. He believes that competitive shooting sports in general and shotgun shooting in particular have a largely untapped recruiting potential.

“The Minneapolis Recruiting Battalion found there were more high school kids shooting trap than playing any other sport in that area, “ says Sgt. 1st Class Stoa. “OCAR says their priority is recruiting and this is definitely a way to do it. I believe that if the Army Reserve fielded an American Trap Team, even if it was for a few events a year, like the Grand American, it would help recruiting efforts tremendously.”


The Army Skeet Team after winning the Skeet Team Doubles at the Armed Forces Skeet Championship in Tucson, Arizona on May 2018. From left to right, SFC Brian Stoa, LTC Carl Wojtaszek (West Point Trap and Skeet coach), SGT Dustan Taylor (Army Marksmanship Unit Skeet Team), CPT John Hedlund (Ft. Hood), SPC Christian Elliot (AMU Skeet Team). SFC Stoa was the only Army Reserve member and won the Doubles and 28 Gauge events for his class.

https://www.usar.army.mil/News/News-Display/Article/1720555/army-reserve-shotgun-champ-targets-recruiting/

Army Trainfire: 1963

The Army adopted the Trainfire model around 1955. The most recent version revamped the program in the late 1970s and served as the primary approach until the new Training Circulars re-wrote doctrine starting in 2016.

Until the new TCs and qualifications for them, all changes to Army small arms standards have reduced the challenge and needed skill. Consider this video where Soldiers conducting routine qualification during Basic are advancing downrange with loaded rifles and expected to take up positions on timed pop-up targets. FM 23-8, which was doctrine when this film was made, included a four table qualification that included shooting while advancing, offhand, and other unsupported shooting. Also note the regular use of peer coaching.