The Big Picture

Info on GEN Lemnitzer, the General Officer with the Distinguished Rifleman badge at the 15:00 minute mark:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyman_Lemnitzer

Lyman Louis Lemnitzer was born at Honesdale, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1899, he graduated from West Point in 1920 and was commissioned in the Coast Artillery. After graduating from the Coast Artillery School in 1921, he served in Rhode Island and the Philippines. He was an instructor at West Point, 1926-30, and after a second tour in the Philippines, 1934-35. After graduation from the Command and General Staff School in 1936, he was an instructor at the Coast Artillery School until 1939. In 1940, on graduating from the Army War College, he was assigned to staff duty with Coast Artillery units in the South. In May 1941, by then a Colonel, he joined the General Staff in Washington, serving in the War Plans Division and on the Army Ground Forces Staff. In June 1942, he was promoted to Brigadier General in command of the 34th Anti-Aircraft Brigade, but soon received appointment as Assistant Chief of Staff of the Allied Forces Headquarters, under General Dwight D. Eisenhower, in London. After aiding in the planning of the North African invasion, he resumed command of the 34th in February 1943 and led it in the opening phases of General George Patton’s Sicilian Campaign. In late June 1943, he became Deputy Chief of Staff of the Allied 15th Army Group (U.S. 7th, British 8th) under General Sir Harold R.L.G. Alexander. He was promoted to Major General in November 1944 and remained with Alexander when the latter became Field Marshal, Supreme Allied Commander, Mediterranean Theater, in December 1944. From November 1945-August 1947, he was the Army Member of the Strategic Survey Committee of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and then Deputy Commandant of the National War College until October 1949. After a year as Director of the Office of Military Assistance in the Department of Defense, he underwent parachute training – at the age of 51 – and was given command of the 11th Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. In November 1951, he was ordered to Korea to command the 7th Infantry Division. He was promoted to Lieutenant General in August 1952 and was named Deputy Chief of Staff of the Army for Plans and Research. In March 1955 he was appointed Commander of U.S. Army Forces in the Far East and of the 8th Army, with the rank of General, and in June became Commander of the Far East Command and of the United Nations Command and Governor of Ryuku Island. In July 1957, he succeeded General Maxwell D. Taylor as Chief of Staff of the Army. He held that post through September 1960 when he was appointed Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. In November 1962, he became Commander of U.S. Forces in Europe, and in January 1963 succeeded to the post of Supreme Allied Commander, Europe. He retired from the Army in July 1969. In 1975 he was appointed by President Gerald Ford to a blue-ribbon panel to investigate domestic activities of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). He was greatly respected as a strategist, one of the most durable soldiers of his time, his powers in no degree were diminished even in advanced age. He died on November 12, 1988 and was buried in Section 30 of Arlington National Cemetery.

EST, Postal Match Enforces Retention, Training

#RetentionViaReadiness #PostalMatch #LetsGoShooting #RoadtoAwesome #KeepPounding #AmericasArmyReserve #USArmyReserve #WeaponsMaster

Army Regulation directs all Soldiers to benefit from formal marksmanship events. Soldiers of the 3-335th Training Support Battalion “Blackhawks” (85th Reserve Support Command) used this training tool to enhance retention and boost training.

Fort Sheridan, Ill.

Soldiers from the 3-335th Training Support Battalion (85th Reserve Support Command) used a local Engagement Skills Trainer to conduct a Postal Match as a part of their unit Marksmanship Team tryouts. In an effort to improve Unit marksmanship skills, esprit de corp, and retention, the 3-335th “Blackhawks” have committed to fielding a team of six Soldiers to compete in the 2020 All Army Small Arms Championship.

During the Unit’s OCT Battle Assembly, Lt. Col. Keith Cowan and Command Sgt. Maj. Matthew Fall directed leadership to put together a list of Soldiers interested in representing their Battalion at All Army. The intent to conduct a form of selection was expressed. Information about the event and overall goal was put out, and after schedules were taken into consideration, 14 3-335th Soldiers signed on for the upcoming tryouts to take place as a part of their November Battle Assembly.

1st Sgt. James Salm and Sgt. 1st Class Joshua Rosendorn helped conduct the training. “I was very impressed with the chain of command’s enthusiasm and support with regards to working towards sending a team to the All Army match.” Sgt. 1st Class Rosendorn said. “I was equally impressed with the level of interest among Soldiers within the Unit.”

As scheduled, the “Blackhawks” Soldiers utilized a local EST facility to conduct their Postal Match and All Army tryouts. Simulators are directed as a part of Table II in the Army’s Individual Weapon Training Strategy (TC 3-20.0) and any of them can be used to host an Informal Postal Match. Staff Sgt. David Kukla, Training NCO from 85th RSC, was on hand for support and assistance during the entire process. Four separate courses of fire were put together, with a maximum aggregate possible score of 150 points. These included a scored zero and rifle qualification, pistol qualification, and a modified Precision Pistol (Bullseye) course.

Staff Sgt. David Kukla confirmed the effectiveness of this approach, saying, “Having a unit come prepared to train at my site, in this manner was appreciated. The EST seems to be an afterthought to many, and as a result, tends to be underutilized.”

Using a Postal Match or other organized shooting format is a way to enhance EST use. The Soldiers participating also found this beneficial. Capt. Jeremy Crochiere said, “The EST tryout was a great way to evaluate potential team members, utilizing a variety of shooting skills, rapidly and efficiently.” Staff Sgt. Paul Prado added, “I liked the tryout because it is a good competition for all, a fair competition. All Soldiers fired the same number of rounds, with the same targets and environment (conditions).”

https://www.usar.army.mil/News/Article/2010184/est-postal-match-enforces-retention-training/



NamePistol QualPistol, BullseyePistol AggRifle QualPistol/Rifle Agg
SFC Rosendorn, Joshua30(15, 15, 15, 15) 609020110
MAJ Zizkovsky, David30(15, 14, 15, 15) 598920109
MSG Brunet, Cody30(15, 14, 15, 15) 598919108
1SG Salm, James29(12, 13, 15, 14) 548320103
CPT Crochiere, Jeremy29(12, 14, 15, 14) 558419103
SSG Prado, Paul27(15, 15, 12, 13) 558218100
SFC Nissen, Devin25(14, 13, 14, 15) 56811798
SFC Wright, Jeffrey26(13, 12, 15, 14) 54801898
SSG Dawson, Dwight23(11, 13, 7, 11) 42651883
SSG Neal, Roger25(13, 13, 13, 14) 53781492
SSG Salinas, Jose17(13, 12, 12, 14) 51681785
SFC Jorgensen, Christopher21(11, 6, 15, 6) 38591271
SFC Latterell, Robert23(12, 13, 12, 14) 51741387
MSG Stine, Bridgette14(8, 8, 8, 12) 36501666

Sharpened Steel Improves Leadership, Training

#LetsGoShooting #RoadtoAwesome #KeepPounding #AmericasArmyReserve #USArmyReserve #WeaponsMastery #USARCombatTeam #USARPistolTeam

Fort Knox, Ky.

Events held by the Hatchet Battalion leads to multiple Soldier training successes, Excellence In Competition, and the Army Reserve’s national-level marksmanship program.

Soldiers of the 2-397th (104th Training Division) conducted a Leader Training event called Sharpened Steel at Fort Knox to hone skills necessary to Soldiers and leaders. The Hatchet Battalion successfully completed two Excellence In Competition events with several Soldiers earning permanent awards for their superior performance.

Holding both pistol and rifle versions of Service Conditions (Combat) Excellence In Competition events at Fort Knox, the pistol event resulted in one Soldier being awarded the EIC Bronze Pistol badge and the rifle event had two Soldiers achieving the distinction. This was the first time the Hatchet Battalion held either event and their command reports a heightened Soldier interest growing as a result.

Their training began with each Soldier establishing Data On Previous Engagements at each yard line and cadre like Sgt. 1st Class Frasier noticed the advantage of using these types of targets. “For many, it was their first time seeing how their shot groups opened up as they moved further from the target.”

The training culminated in an Excellence In Competition Rifle event consisting of timed stages from 400, 300, 200, and 100 yards, and then a Close Quarter Battle stage shot at 75, 50, and 25 yards. The Pistol event was a mix of precision and speed from multiple positions and distances at 30 yards and in. This training is a holistic test of Soldier lethality because it incorporates short and medium range engagements, different shooting positions, speed reloads, and – in the Rifle event – a 25 yard rush to each firing line.

Even Soldiers finishing lower in the rankings found value in the event. Supply NCO Sgt. Vanderpool explained, “I’ve never been taught a lot of the marksmanship techniques that were shown. I learned a better way to hold the M16 and gained confidence in my marksmanship skills.”

In addition to the event being a tremendous training opportunity, Sgts. 1st Class Daugherty and Combs received their EIC Bronze Badge, which supersedes the expert badge on the Army Service Uniform, for scoring in the top 10% of the match.

Also during training year 2019, the Hatchet Battalion had two Soldiers compete as members of USAR Competitive Marksmanship Program, with Sgt. 1st Class Combs participating on the Service Pistol team and Command Sgt. Major Michael Ball participating with the Service Conditions/Combat team at the Armed Forces Skill At Arms Meeting. Their participation on the teams has improved the Battalion’s marksmanship training as they bring what they’ve learned back to the unit. As an Army Reserve Drill Sergeant unit, the Hatchet Battalion’s Drill Sergeants will take what they’ve learned and teach it to new Soldiers in Initial Entry Training, which will immediately impact marksmanship skills across the entire force.

https://www.usar.army.mil/News/News-Display/Article/1965677/sharpened-steel-improves-leadership-training/