USAR CMP at Rifle Nationals

Congratulations to the Army Reserve Service Rifle Team during the National Matches. MSG Mango (9th MSC) won the Mountain Man Trophy for having the highest overall combined score in the National Team Trophy, National Individual Trophy and the President’Hundred. MSG Mango won the National Trophy and became the first marksman to ever win both the Pistol and Rifle NTI. SSG Friend (USACAPOC (A) won the shootoff and won the President’s Hundred Match. CPT Freeman finished 4th, MSG Mango finished 11th and SFC Micholick (Army Reserve Careers Division) finished 14th overall out of 1000 competitors. GREAT JOB USAR. NRA 2 and 4 Man Team matches and NRA Individual Matches will be conducted over the next 6 days followed by 1000 yard Individual and Team Matches

Rob Mango Wins 2015 Mountain Man, NTI

Master Sgt. Rob Mango of the US Army Reserve Competitive Marksmanship Program won the Mountain Man Trophy. This trophy is awarded to the Service Rifle competitor at the CMP National Matches (Camp Perry) for having the highest overall combined score in the National Team Trophy, National Individual Trophy and the President’s Hundred.

MSG Mango also won the National Trophy and became the first marksman to ever win both the Pistol and Rifle NTI.

Kris Friend Wins President’s Match

Army Reserve Competitive Marksmanship Program team member Staff Sgt. Kris Friend won the President’s Rifle Match at the Civilian Marksmanship Program National Matches, Camp Perry.

SSG Friend shot a 298-10X (out of a 300 possible) during the main match and finished with a 97-5 (out of a 100 possible) in the shoot off.

This is the second time SSG Friend has won this national tournament, the first being in 2007.

Camp Perry CMP Rifle Nationals 2015

Congratulations to CPT Freeman on winning the Hearst Doubles Top Individual with a score of 297-11X and also being the high individual in the National Team Trophy Match with a score of 497-19X. CPT Freeman won both the Pershing Trophy (Top Overall) and the Rattlesnake Trophy (Top Army Competitor).

The Army Reserve Team finished 4th overall out of 87 teams firing. Great job goes out to the Army Marksmanship Unit for winning the National Team Trophy and to the National Guard on their Top Reserve Component Team win.

Congratulations to Staff Sergeant Friend. Staff Sergeant Friend was promoted to Staff Sergeant today just prior to the National Team Trophy Match. Staff Sergeant Friend is a Psychological Operations Non-commissioned Officer assigned to United States Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) He was promoted by his pair firer partner, CPT Freeman.

History of American Target Development

Great article on the history of targetry. For the tactical types, check this out:


U.S. Cavalry troopers were required to shoot dismounted, single handed, at 15 and 20 yards on the Army Target "L". After they qualified on foot, they would then repeat the course of fire, this time astride a horse at the gallop.

Those complaining that competition and bullseye shooting doesn’t take real world concerns into account do so from their ignorance of what these events actually are and can be.

A Short History of American Target Development and Evolution
by Hap Rocketto

The evolution of targets continues to meet the needs of the competitor measuring his skills. Double Distinguished Smallbore Rifleman and noted shooting historian Paul Nordquist mused that, “The target is a measuring device one used to measure the abilities of a shooter. As with all measuring devices you pick the one most suitable to the task. No matter which one you pick there is an element of arbitrariness involved.”

With that in mind, and with all of what has been said about target development and evolution, there is one constant through all the years of organized competitive marksmanship in the United States. The object of the game has always been to hit the center of the circle. Dimensions of the target and aiming black, width of the rings, or the distance at which the target is engaged matters not. What is important to remember is that the target has almost always been a circle and, no matter what size the circle, the center is still the center.

Read more:
http://www.ssusa.org/articles/2015/7/5/a-short-history-of-american-target-development-and-evolution/